5 Strategies for Teaching Student Responsibility

5 Strategies for Teaching Student Responsibility


As middle school and high school teachers, our classrooms are full of young, budding students who are adjusting to a mature school career in which teachers don't hand-hold, emphasize syllables in a verbal spelling test, or allow attempt after attempt on a failed assignment that the dog ate. It isn't easy! It is our responsibility as teachers to develop lesson plans that not only teach content but also responsibility, accountability, career skills, people skills, and more. Focusing on academic knowledge alone gets the job done, but we are still failing our students by forgoing life skills and responsibility in the classroom. Fostering these "non-academic" skills will not only produce a student with good grades, but with well-rounded life skills as well.

Start off the new school year with great strategies under your belt for teaching student responsibility. Helping your middle or high school students learn about responsibility and accountability can help them better prepare for their careers or their futures. #teaching #responsibility #lessons #lessonplans #tpt #students #teachers

While teaching life skills, responsibility, and accountability to our students is necessary, it can be difficult. Using these 5 incredible strategies for teaching student responsibility will help teachers to integrate lessons on responsibility into their regular content-centered lesson plans. As the old adage goes, give a man a fish and he eats for a day, but teach a man to fish and he eats for life. Teaching your students responsibility will not only make your job and their studies easier, but will also set them up for success in life. 

5 Incredible Strategies for Teaching Student Responsibility

1. Keeping & Organizing a Class Notebook or Interactive Notebook

When combined with other engaging lessons, including components below used to foster responsibility, an Interactive Notebook can be a great tool for teaching student responsibility! If used correctly, the IN encourages mind mapping, provides clear expectations for classwork, and requires students to remain responsible and on-task throughout the semester.


2. Classroom jobs

Classroom jobs are elevated beyond elementary ideas of line leader and door holder. You can teach responsibility to your students by delegating jobs like taking attendance, managing classroom supplies and books, controlling external distractions, keeping the class on task, and assisting the teacher. 


3. Homework

Homework buzzes continuously as a hot topic in the teaching world, but the truth remains. Assigning homework, and expecting students to actually complete it thoroughly and on time, instills a sense of responsibility. Don't allow your students every excuse in the book to miss deadlines or turn in half-completed assignments.


4. Group Leadership & Collaboration

One of the most sure-fire methods to encouraging responsibility is to make a student responsible for the success of others. Using these group leadership and collaboration tactics can ensure the growth of student responsibility in your classroom.

Café Conversations
By highlighting conflicting opinions in a small group setting, students are provided with a perspective on a topic or lesson that differs from their own. This teaching strategy works well when the teacher assigns perspectives that will open a dialogue and encourage students to consider the information they must present from an unbiased point of view.

Human Timeline
Bring a boring, two-dimensional timeline to life by assigning content and dates to each of your students and having them physically stand in chronological order. Not only will this engage students and get them out of their seats, requiring cooperation and collaboration among them, but it will help retention of "boring" dates.

Graffiti Boards
Graffiti may be illegal on the streets but it's quite beneficial in the classroom. Graffiti boards are a central place for student collaboration. Students write questions or comments on the graffiti board, allowing others to take responsibility and provide answers, ask follow-up questions, or consider new perspectives and opinions.

5. Presentations

Just as the pieces of a puzzle fit together perfectly, providing the viewer with a complete picture, your students can become the pieces of a figurative jigsaw puzzle in your classroom. Have each student learn about a certain topic or sub-topic and then collaborate with the rest of the class, disseminating the information to their classmates. Having students become an authority on a specific idea or topic instills in them the gravity of their participation for the success of their friends and classmates.


Bonus Resources!

For more ideas, check out Teaching Students Responsibility, Teaching Strategies that Instruct Responsibility and Getting Students to Take Responsibility for Learning! Also, encourage your students to take an active part in their learning experience, which will further foster responsibility, by taking a Student Survey.

Also check out the Facing History website for more teaching strategies that can foster student responsibility and other critical classroom skills!

There are unlimited resources online that can help to build student responsibility in your classroom, but the greatest indicator of a successful classroom is commitment from both the teacher and students. Teaching your students the importance of their responsibility and then incorporating these requirements into your curriculum will ensure that your students will be more responsible by year's end. Use these 5 strategies for teaching student responsibility to foster a sense of class-wide responsibility. 



Start off the new school year with great strategies under your belt for teaching student responsibility. Helping your middle or high school students learn about responsibility and accountability can help them better prepare for their careers or their futures. #teaching #responsibility #lessons #lessonplans #tpt #students #teachers
Happy Teaching!
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Michele Luck
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5 Classroom Management Books Every Teacher Should Read

5 Classroom Management Books Every Teacher Should Read


Historian Henry Adams said it best, stating that “Unity is vision; it must have been part of the process of learning to see.”  As ideal as it would be to begin each school year in a state of perfect order, teacher and students hand-in-hand, united in a blissful exploration of knowledge, it’s not realistic. Our classrooms take work – continuous, fluid, hard work – and good classroom management methods can turn even the most disorganized and mismanaged classroom into a successful learning environment.
Whether you are a new teacher or you've been in the teaching profession forever, these classroom management books are the perfect summer reads to help you start off the new school year on the right foot with your classes. I'm really partial to the last one! 

Classroom management can be a comprehensive collection of methods, skills, and recommendations, but seeking proven methods from valid sources can weed out the misinformation and help you build a solid classroom management toolbox, easily accessible and tailored to your teaching styles and classroom needs. These 5 classroom management books every teacher should read are great for building that solid foundation of critical classroom management methods for new teachers and tenured teachers alike. Teaching your class without classroom control is a recipe for disaster, but embarking on a quest for classroom management knowledge with these 5 classroom management books every teacher should read will guarantee a better, more orderly, outcome.

5 Classroom Management Books Every Teacher Should Read

1. Real Talk About Classroom Management: 50 Best Practices That Work and Show You Believe in Your Students - A Corwin Teaching Essentials book by Serena Pariser, Real Talk About Classroom Management presents fifty proven methods for efficient and effective classroom management. Alongside anecdotal evidence, these tips provide a solid foundation for starting the school year right, developing relationships with students, maintaining a sense of order and discipline in your classroom, and managing your own emotional state and work-life balance.

2. THE Classroom Management Book - The title says it all; this Wong and Wong guide to classroom management is THE book to begin your study in classroom management skills and methods. Offering practical solutions to real-life problems in the classroom, Wong and Wong address adaptable classroom management skills that are easy to implement and necessary in a well-managed classroom.

3. Classroom Management Success in 7 Days or Less: The Ultra-Effective Classroom Management System for Teachers - Resource book 1 of Needs-Focused Teaching, Classroom Management Success by Rob Plevin delivers an easy-to-implement 6 part plan. Plevin also includes additional downloadable resources to provide a more comprehensive coverage of the topic. 

BONUS! Pick up Plevin's free Needs-Focused Teaching resources to reinforce concepts discussed in his Classroom Management Success book!

4. 199 Mistakes New 7th-12th Grade Teachers Make and How to Prevent Them: Insider Secrets to Avoid Classroom Blunders - From the same Atlantic Publishing Group as 199 Mistakes Teachers Make and How to Prevent Them: Insider Secrets to Avoid Classroom Blunders, this 7th-12th Grade special edition highlights skills to form stronger, yet appropriate, relationships with your students, coworkers, and other district employees, while highlighting common mistakes teachers make to allow classroom disorder and how to regain order again.

5. Classroom Management Matters: The Social-Emotional Learning Approach Children Deserve - By Gianna Cassetta and Brook Sawyer, Classroom Management Matters provides a developmental approach to ensuring classroom management by fostering healthy relationships with students, assessing development and adjusting your teaching style to ensure student progress, maintaining boundaries, and responding appropriately to classroom conflict.

BONUS! Learn more about Social-Emotional Learning from the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL)!

SUPER BONUS! The classroom management chapters in A Lesson Plan for Teachers, New or Old (Experienced, that is!) Guidebook also present easy-to-implement, proven methods that provide a down-to-earth approach to classroom management!

You can realize your vision through unity in your classroom, just as Henry Adams expressed. Using these 5 classroom management books for teachers will arm new and experienced teachers with the classroom management skills to effectively manage your classroom and lead your students on a path to academic success. Unpreparedness in your classroom can be detrimental; using these proven methods, anecdotes, and suggested responses, you can prepare for almost anything that will come your way during this school year. Maintaining a sense of order in your classroom is vital and these 5 classroom management books are sure to provide a solid foundation of knowledge for teachers. 
 
Whether you are a new teacher or you've been in the teaching profession forever, these classroom management books are the perfect summer reads to help you start off the new school year on the right foot with your classes. I'm really partial to the last one!

Happy Teaching!

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Michele Luck
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5 Professional Development Books Every Teacher Should Read

5 Professional Development Books Every Teacher Should Read


Being a middle school or high school teacher in today’s world is hard enough, but keeping current with lesson plans that are both relevant and engaging can be daunting. Teaching should be a rewarding and exciting career, but it isn’t without its difficulties. Keeping up-to-date with professional development can make your job less intimidating, but you aren’t limited to the boring professional development curriculum of the past.  Instead, there are many modern and out-of-the-box curricula, instructional aides, texts, and lesson plans that can elevate the professional development for new teachers, senior teachers, and administration alike.

Whether you are a new teacher or you've been in the teaching profession forever, these professional development books are the perfect summer reads to help you start off the new school year on the right foot. I'm really partial to the last one!

Using these 5 professional development books every teacher should read, professional development becomes engaging, educational, and inspiring, creating just the right spark to make it through a challenging school year. Lacking professional development is no longer a valid excuse for diving into a new school year unprepared – there are many sources to help advance your educational knowledge. Professional development using these 5 books every teacher should read will provide an exciting and new approach to standard professional development.


5 Professional Development Books Every Teacher Should Read

1. Fish: A Proven Way to Boost Morale and Improve Results, Stephen C. Lundin, Harry Paul, and John Christensen - About the Seattle Fish Market, Fish analyzes the rehabilitation of a dreadful, morale-lacking business environment and how the Fish Market provides a striking contrast of fun and excitement. Lundin makes comparisons between the Fish Market and "stuffy" workplaces, and the comparisons that he draws can easily be applied in a classroom setting, both among staff, and among students.

2. 10 Mindframes for Visible Learning: Teaching for Success, John Hattie and Klaus Zierer - Hattie and Zierer aim to provide a strong foundation for maximizing success in classrooms. By highlighting mindframes such as assessment, feedback, collaboration, success criteria, and communication, 10 Mindframes for Visible Learning provides beneficial professional skills for both new and seasoned teachers.

3. Teaching: Level 1: Everything I wanted to know when I started out as a teacher, Sergio Travieso Teniente - Broken into six sections, Teaching: Level 1 takes plenty of personal experience and organizes it into a visceral guide to teaching. Teniente discusses teachers, content, presentation, preparation, the classroom, and the student, while providing real-life examples and advice.

BONUS! Another great account of teaching struggles is See Me After Class: Advice for Teachers by Teachers, by Roxanna Elden. Elden shares entertaining and insightful experiences from hundreds of teachers and offers up advice on challenging scenarios.

4. Teach Like a Champion 2.0: 62 Techniques that Put Students on the Path to College, Doug Lemov - Following first edition Teach Like a Champion: 49 Techniques that Put Students on the Path to College, Teach Like a Champion 2.0 discusses teaching strategies, classroom modeling, sample lesson plans, and other techniques that will help your high school students prepare for higher education.

BONUS! Get the Teach Like a Champion Field Guide 2.0: A Practical Resource to Make the 62 Techniques Your Own to accompany the text!

5. Teach Like a Pirate: Increase Student Engagement, Boost Your Creativity, and Transform Your Life as an Educator, Dave Burgess - Accompanied by Lead Like a Pirate: Make School Amazing for Your Students and Staff, and Learn Like a Pirate: Empower Your Students to Collaborate, Lead, and Succeed, Teach Like a Pirate applies concepts of seminars of the same name by providing new techniques and inspiration to increase student engagement, boost your creativity, and transform your life as an educator. 

SUPER BONUS! Check out A Lesson Plan for Teachers, New or Old (Experienced, that is!) Guidebook. Written with first-hand accounts and struggles of a young teacher, this read is sure to provide beneficial advice, or at least make you feel a little less crazy as the year progresses!

With these 5+ engaging professional development books, the challenges and struggles you are faced with throughout the school year will seem conquerable and commonplace. No one ever said teaching would be easy. They only said it would be worth it. Proper preparation, commitment, and the right attitude can take your teaching career a long way, and these professional development books are crucial resources for teacher survival. Check out further professional development resources at the Facing History Professional Development website.


Whether you are a new teacher or you've been in the teaching profession forever, these professional development books are the perfect summer reads to help you start off the new school year on the right foot. I'm really partial to the last one!
Happy Teaching!
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Michele Luck
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7 Awesome Books for Teaching Government

7 Awesome Books for Teaching Government


Often, middle and high school students have been conditioned to associate government with the current political arena, but the study of government incorporates so much more. Teaching middle and high school students about government includes the teaching the inner-workings of the judicial, legislative, and executive branches, but also geographical studies, and general U.S. and World History. Current events are always relevant and educational, and delving deeper into the history of our government can provide your students with a vital and inciting foundation to encourage learning about government.  


Reading novels or informational text in the Government classroom can be a great way to get your students engaged in your lesson. These seven books are a great start toward creating a more engaging and interactive classroom. I just love the first on on the list!



Give your class a great educational foundation to government with these 7 awesome books for middle and high school government students. By incorporating attention-grabbing, historically accurate books, with current events and political study, you encourage learning at a deeper level and your students will have the opportunity to combine learning with engagement. Using these 7 awesome books for teaching government, your lesson plans will elevate from adequate to elegant!


 

7 Awesome Books for Middle and High School Students


1.     Americanah – By Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah follows two young lovers as they escape Nigeria and are separated, one off to America and the other to London. Ifemelu faces racial challenges while pursuing an American education and Obinze struggles to survive in England, both returning to Nigeria once a political shift occurs.

2.     The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness – Author Michelle Alexander examines racial profiling and targeting and illuminates the sheer number of black men behind bars. By translating race into a criminal justice issue, America is able to mask the lack of racial progress since Jim Crow laws were decimated.  

BONUS! After reading The New Jim Crow, split students into two groups. Have half of the students collaborate on the current criminal justice and politics regarding racial profiling. Have the others study racial profiling around the time of Jim Crow. Have students search for comparisons and disparities, using a class-wide Venn Diagram to draw parallels.


3.     The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian – Part-time Indian Junior challenges his destiny on the Indian reservation by attending school in an all-white school, exploring his dreams through adolescence and his teen years. Sherman Alexie’s words coupled with illustrations by Ellen Forney, this read presents an emotional take on Native American living.

BONUS! Let students research life on an Indian reservation, including the accounts told from Alexie's novel, photos from online sources like the Journal, and other media that may support their research. Have them share whether they would have enjoyed life on the reservation, what things they may have had to forgo if living on a reservation, and draw parallels to their own lives.


4.     Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics (Transgressing Boundaries: Studies in Black Politics and Black Communities) – Democracy Remixed, by Cathy J. Cohen, analyzes survey results from the Black Youth Project, exploring political ramifications of black youth and their experiences.

5.     Sleeping Giant: The Untapped Economic and Political Power of America’s New Working Class – By Tamara Draut, Sleeping Giant explores the political power held by the today’s working class. Draut combines personal accounts, expert analysis, and in-depth studies to discuss the working class, racial and gender exclusion, and today’s Fight for $15 minimum wage battle. 

BONUS! Debate activity! Have students take opposing positions on the Fight for $15 minimum wage battle. Hold a classroom debate, discussing pros and cons of raising minimum wage in America.


6.     Affluence and Influence: Economic Inequality and Political Power in America – Martin Gilens criticizes America’s political climate and designation as a democratic country as it only patronizes the opinions and desires of its upper 1%. Gilens discusses and analyzes policy changes and draws shocking and disparaging conclusions across socioeconomic lines.

BONUS! Reflection time! Have students research some of the top one-percenters of America. Draw comparisons from Affluence and Influence, explore political decisions influenced by the 1%, and then have students reflect on political persuasion they would desire if also a part of the 1%. How does this translate into democracy? 

7.     Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance – The 44th president of the United States of America, Barack Obama, tells a personal account of his adolescence and coming of age in America, faced with the truths of his father’s past and the racial inequalities of his present.



Reading novels or informational text in the Government classroom can be a great way to get your students engaged in your lesson. These seven books are a great start toward creating a more engaging and interactive classroom. I just love the first on on the list!

From a Walking Tour with the Presidents Centers Activity, to a U.S. Document Analysis Bundled Activity, many online government activities can accompany these 7 awesome books for teaching government to elevate your Middle and High School lesson plans. Introduce your students to a part-time Indian, the Black Youth Project, or our 44th president, and you'll not only educate them on government, but instill a desire to delve deeper and learn more about the governmental workings of our nation.

Happy Teaching!

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Michele Luck
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7 Great Books for Teaching Middle & High School Economics

7 Great Books for Teaching Middle & High School Economics


Teaching Economics in middle school and high school builds a strong foundation for government and civics studies, but also prepares your students for critical life lessons. Economics is a worldwide issue - every culture, every country, and every person is influenced by their economic situation and the economics occurring in the society around them. Encouraging economic study in your social studies lesson plans, using CCSS and common core standards, will allow your students to develop proficiency in an area that will be beneficial both within their history career and in their personal lives. You can use dull economic textbooks and additional reading to teach economic content, or you can use these 7 great books for teaching middle and high school Economics, which are sure to relay the important content to your students, but also to spark a further interest in economic study which will further your students' education.


I love these awesome books for helping teach economics concepts to my middle and high school students. They help to introduce the finance and math subjects in a way to reach more kids in my classroom. I especially love the first one!

Help your middle and high school students to study up on government and economics with drab, regurgitated textbook material, or inspire a strong foundation in economic knowledge by encouraging your students to delve further into the world of economics. Use these 7 awesome books for middle and high school Economics students to provide an alternative and exciting study in economics. With these 7 great economics books, your students will develop an academic foundation in world government and economics, but also in personal economics, which will benefit them significantly in their adult lives.


7 Awesome Books for Middle and High School Economics Students


1. The Cartoon Introduction to Economics: Volume One: Microeconomics - One of two volumes, The Cartoon Introduction to Economics: Volume One: Microeconomics by Yoram Bauman, Ph.D., presents a hysterical take on Microeconomics. Perhaps the most brilliant take on teaching Economics, Bauman discusses price theory, individual vs. group outcomes, strategic interactions, market interactions, elasticity, and more.

BONUS! Also pick up The Cartoon Introduction to Economics: Volume Two: Macroeconomics to round off the study. Volume Two includes topics such as unemployment, recession, inflation, and more macro study.


2. The Amazon Way: 14 Leadership Principles Behind the World's Most Disruptive Company - John Rossman transports readers into the mind of Jeff Bezos as he established the world's largest Internet retailer, discussing Amazon's third-party seller program, enterprise services, revolution of Internet industry, and transformation from book retailer to primary online retailer for all things purchasable.

BONUS! Explore the World's Most Innovative Companies of 2017 and read about how Amazon tops the list.


3. How to be The Startup Hero: A Guide and Textbook for Entrepreneurs and Aspiring Entrepreneurs - The Startup Hero, by Tim Draper, serves as a revolutionary guide for aspiring entrepreneurs, addressing the struggles they will encounter and offering tips for embarking on the entrepreneurial road. This book will demonstrate the many layers of entrepreneurship and economy to your students.

4. Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything - By Steven D. Levitt, Freakonomics is a popular yet unexpected take on economics, asking all of the "right" questions that you'd never expect to hear from an Economist. An entertaining method to educating the general public on economics, Levitt dives into economic theory with a humorous approach.

BONUS! Radio link! Have students choose a Freakonomics Radio Archive episode, study it, and then present it to the class. Tie it into topics learned from the Freakonomics book.


5. The Everything Economics Book: From theory to practice, your complete guide to understanding economics today - The Everything Economics Book by David Mayer and Melanie Fox breaks down complicated economic knowledge and makes it easier to understand, presenting topics like trade, market intervention, unemployment, inflation, supply and demand, foreign exchange markets, and economy measurement.

6. The Armchair Economist: Economics and Everyday Life - Steven Landsburg studies economic questions with a practical twist, exploring off beat topic like the safety of seatbelts, celebrity endorsements, oil spills, workplace safety, and more.

BONUS! Play The Island Game from the Center for Economic Conversion.


7. Economics Through Everyday Life: From China and Chili Dogs to Marx and Marijuana - Economics Through Everyday Life, by Anthony Clark, is considered a primer to economics for aspiring Economists. In a slow-paced introduction, Clark explores markets, taxes, inequality, jobs, business cycles, recessions, and more. Clark even includes true stories to provide a relative approach to economic study.

SUPER BONUS! Download Where Do Goods Come From? Interactive Resource - it's a FREEBIE!!! Use this resource to help instill the knowledge learned in these 7 awesome reads.


I love these awesome books for helping teach economics concepts to my middle and high school students. They help to introduce the finance and math subjects in a way to reach more kids in my classroom. I especially love the first one!

Most people think money, finances, and economics are boring, everyday topics that individuals are forced to learn but never enjoy. Those people are likely using academic textbooks to "learn" economics, but the only thing they're likely to retain is a resentment for how boring the topic is. These 7 great books for teaching middle and high school economics are sure to encourage your students to embrace the study of economics and not only retain, but enjoy, the knowledge! There are so many entertaining economics games and interactive lesson plans, and coupling them with these 7 great books for economic classes are sure to inspire your students to an economic wealth of knowledge!

Happy Teaching!

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Michele Luck
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7 Great Books for Teaching World Geography

7 Great Books for Teaching World Geography


Teaching World Geography is rewarding in many ways. Teaching geography in middle school and high school allows you to travel through time and space, leading a room full of eager World Geography students to new cultures in faraway places. Geography doesn’t have to be maps and memory drills; instead, interactive geography lessons can merge core content, images, diversity, technology, and emotional accounts, transporting your students across the world while remaining safely in their seats in your classroom. Boring geography studies are sure to go in one ear and out the other, but integrating these 7 great books for teaching world geography into your lesson plans will provide a new perspective on an otherwise difficult topic.

Reading full length books in World Geography can be a great way to address core content, integrate diversity, and practice skills. These seven books are at the top of my list when teaching my Geography students. I love the images the first one suggests!


Today’s teachers are on the brink of innovation, utilizing today’s technology with new teaching strategies, classroom community techniques, and other exciting lesson plans and ideas to integrate into their classroom. However, World Geography is still often seen as a topic of repetitive regurgitation. Memory practice and drills frequent the lesson plans of World Geography teachers, but your students aren’t likely to retain their geography knowledge once they leave your classroom. Instead, using these 7 great books for teaching World Geography will transplant your middle school and high schools students to a different place, allowing them to absorb general social studies topics while learning, and remembering, world geography.


7 Great Books for Teaching World Geography


1. Where Am I Wearing?: A Global Tour to the Countries, Factories, and People That Make Our Clothes – Kelsey Timmerman’s Where Am I Wearing? transports readers alongside journalist Timmerman as he researches the manufacturers of his clothing, encountering poor working conditions and the poverty that riddles many of the workers he meets. Check out the 2012 version for bonus content updating the reader on a fair trade shoe factory.

BONUS! Have students research the countries of their own clothing, and design and share Paper Dolls Around the World with their classmates. You may be teaching teenagers, but they’re sure to engage in a tactile activity like coloring!

2. Material World: A Global Family Portrait – Material World, by Peter Menzel, Mann, and Kennedy, follows over a dozen photographers as they co-mingle with families from other cultures. Illustrating the cultural similarities and differences with striking photographs, Material World provides faces and names with whom your students will connect.

3. Women in the Material World - By Faith D'Aluisio and Menzel, Women in the Material World accompanies Material World: A Global Family Portrait, interviewing and intertwining with the lives of women around the world. 

4. The Power of Place: Geography, Destiny, and Landscape - By Harm de Blij,The Power of Place examines the importance of the culture and physical location into which a person in born. He explores language, technological advances, medical risks, environmental challenges, and more, while stressing the current political and social stance on geography.

BONUS! The Power of Place pairs great with any geography lesson, but integrating it early into a complete World Geography course will ensure a solid foundation for your geography students!

SUPER BONUS! Have students research a country and hypothesize about the differences they would encounter if they had been born in that country. Share with the class!

5. Garbage Land: On the Secret Trail of Trash - Garbage Land presents a nontraditional approach to exploring and learning geography. Author Elizabeth Royte studies garbage consumption around the world. Though teaching about trash isn't commonplace, this book provides a vital look at an aspect of culture and geography which is often overlooked.

6. Hungry Planet: What the World Eats - Like Material World, Menzel's Hungry Planet follows thirty families worldwide, taking an intimate look into their shopping carts, their kitchen cabinets, and on their dinner tables. Menzel studies what kind of groceries each family buys but also delves into the familial traditions that occur around the dinner table.

BONUS! Have students read excerpts from all three Menzel works (Material World, Women in the Material World, and Hungry Planet) and make charts to compare and contrast the clothing and food from different countries.


7. Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story - Douglas Preston, scientist and adventurer, uprooted his life in 2012 to set off on an exploratory expedition to find the White City, also known as the Lost City of the Monkey God, in Honduras. Preston recounts his experiences on the expedition, intimately discussing Honduran culture, the history behind the curse of the Lost City, the scientific findings of the journey, and the life-threatening disease that he and his fellow scientists contracted.

Reading full length books in World Geography can be a great way to address core content, integrate diversity, and practice skills. These seven books are at the top of my list when teaching my Geography students. I love the images the first one suggests!Though most traditional World Geography lesson plans include memory drills and skills practice, hoping that students will grasp the knowledge they are repetitively studying, they may not retain this knowledge. An interactive approach to teaching World Geography is more effective in presenting a point of view that your students will retain. Using these 7 great books for teaching World Geography alongside interactive lessons like this Five Themes of Geography Centers Investigation Activity, students will transport across the globe, experiencing and understanding other cultures, and building a strong foundation in geography that they may otherwise lack.


Happy Teaching!

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Michele Luck
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