Fun & Engaging Lessons for At Home Learning

Fun & Engaging Lessons for At Home Learning


Now that many of us parents and grandparents are unexpectedly fulfilling the role of homeschool teacher due to school closures, we may be unsure where to find solid resources for teaching American geography. Non-traditional instruction only fills part of a child's day and we need to go above and beyond the assignment list to ensure the successes of our advancing students. While you probably didn't plan to home school your child this year, there are many resources to help you take hold of the reigns and propel your child's Social Studies education.
Homeschooling and Distance Learning can be a great challenge if you don't have the right resources for your students. Instead of assigning textbook reading or endless online searches, let your kids have fun with engaging activities as they practice skills and learn key content in American History, Geography, and more!
Even without a degree in education, you can find the resources and lessons to effectively teach your elementary school, middle school, or high school child from home. With a little patience and preparation, your homeschooling efforts will pay off with a well-educated kiddo (and hopefully only a few gray hairs!).

There are so many great resources online, but finding resources that are accurate, simple, and engaging can be overwhelming. Finding resources that offer consistency can also be a challenge.

This United States Primary Source Analysis Bundle can provide a comprehensive collection of American History documents and images for secondary students to analyze, practicing Social Studies skills while reviewing content.

When you home school, it is best to start with the foundation and build upward. Your students can provide valuable feedback during the process.  Look for resources that address basic skills. Consider Mapping Lessons that cover key content while also teaching students how to examine and create maps to show what they know. This Mapping the World activity is a fun one I use in the first days of school to set my students up with that valuable foundation.

Homeschooling and Distance Learning can be a great challenge if you don't have the right resources for your students. Instead of assigning textbook reading or endless online searches, let your kids have fun with engaging activities as they practice skills and learn key content in American History, Geography, and more!

Homeschooling with Task Cards

Homeschooling and Distance Learning can be a great challenge if you don't have the right resources for your students. Instead of assigning textbook reading or endless online searches, let your kids have fun with engaging activities as they practice skills and learn key content in American History, Geography, and more!Task cards are a great way to meet your kids where they are. Task cards have many different uses and applications, including engaging hands-on learning, assessment, skills reinforcement (especially great for geography skills reinforcement!), practice, and content introduction.

This American Geography Task Card Set includes 200 cards that can be used as a scavenger hunt activity, mapping practice, research prompts, and fun, engaging games! Task Cards are great for making rotating centers (which get students UP and MOVING!). Task Cards also work well with groups and teams, so if your child has siblings or friends who they can Skype or Zoom, they can work in digital pairs!

Reinforce skills with a printed map so students can mark the places they discover as they learn. Or, use an online resource like Sheppard Software to practice states (or countries, regions, etc.) with a timer.

American History Resources

In addition to task cards, this History Headline News Activity is great for upper elementary students and can help pull kids from excessive current media engagement. This activity allows them to visit this day in a historical context and report on their findings.  The fun and diverse topics will keep them wanting to learn more.

Also, homeschool students can engage with current events with a Current Events Timeline Activity.  The skill of timelining is vital to reinforce the cause and effect of history, but is also a great way to let learner's hands participate in visual and content reinforcement.

Find more Social Studies resources for your homeschool classroom here.

Homeschooling and Distance Learning can be a great challenge if you don't have the right resources for your students. Instead of assigning textbook reading or endless online searches, let your kids have fun with engaging activities as they practice skills and learn key content in American History, Geography, and more!

Teaching for Non-Teachers

Though the information at hand may be overwhelming for parents who are not used to teaching, there is a wealth of information available to help you put on your teacher hat and take charge in your homeschool classroom. Above all, keeping your child engaged throughout the school break is key. Though this time is confusing, scary, and stressful for all, maintaining a routine for your kids is vital for their mental and educational well-being.

You can read more about how to spark a historical interest in your child with this blog post on Creating an Interest in History. You can also find tips on how to teach inquiry to your children, and how to appropriately and accurately use primary sources in the home school classroom, in this blog post.

Happy Homeschooling!

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Brittany Cloyd
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Brain Breaks for Teachers: Work Smarter, Not Harder During the COVID-19 Quarantine

Brain Breaks for Teachers: Work Smarter, Not Harder During the COVID-19 Quarantine


Many teachers were probably burning the midnight oil before the United States went into quarantine from the Novel Coronavirus. With teaching responsibilities moved to digital platforms, student (and parent) questions coming in all day long, and perhaps even your own children at home to coach through online schooling, you may be feeling more than a little stressed.
With teaching responsibilities moved to digital platforms, student (and parent) questions coming in all day long, and perhaps even your own children at home to coach through online schooling, you may be feeling more than a little stressed. Brain breaks are the key to staying sane during the quarantine. #brainbreaks #quarantine #teachingfromhome

It is very important to still take Brain Breaks just as you would in the classroom! Even though many of you are working from home, it isn't much of a vacation. You still work the same hours (sometimes even longer!). You still have to be available and on demand for the better part of your day. You have to field difficult topics and questions without verbally speaking. You may even be trying to fit in your own child's instruction amidst your regular teaching. Brain breaks are the key to staying sane during the quarantine.

All of the brain breaks designed for the classroom can take place at home too. In fact, many of them will become even easier inside your own four walls! Especially with the stress surrounding the current state of our nation, you should certainly allow yourself a few minutes to check out from the chaos.

 To start, try the basic tips from the blog post on Self-Care, Put on Your Oxygen Mask First: Self-Care in the First Month of School (and the rest of the year, too!).

1. Try chair yoga! Stretch into a few poses in your office chair or roll a towel out on your living room floor for an even more engaging practice. Don't skip Savasana! The body can benefit the most from a few minutes of peace and quiet. Check out 15 Yoga Poses to Shed the Teacher Tension and Stretch Through Chronic Desk-Job Pain.

2. Enjoy desk drinks & sneak-able snacks! But wait... you're at home, so there's no need to sneak! Allow yourself a favorite coffee drink or sweet dessert when tensions rise. Veg out on your favorite treat in between email replies or student outreach.

3. Break for books! Now more than ever, it's important to unplug from the social media storm. You should stay apprised of current news but not allow yourself to be sucked into the endless scroll. Check out to a fantasy land for a few minutes each day.

From the comfort of your own home, you can take even more brain breaks! You don't have to wait for the bell or your planning period.

For more brain breaks, try some of the following:

  • Dance break! Turn on your favorite jam and wiggle to the beat. Many National dance studios are even streaming free ballet classes on Facebook.
  • Play period music. For a brain break with an educational twist, keep your focus with music from certain periods of history. 
  • Color or draw. I'm sure your art teacher colleagues will tell you - you're never too old for art! 
  • Crosswords, mazes, or word searches. The best brain breaks are those that allow you a few minutes of mindless distraction. Keep your brain spry by solving puzzle clues in between assignments. Try these End of the Year World History Puzzles or these End of the Year Modern America Activities!  
  • Travel! From the comfort of your own couch, of course. No need to risk exposure when you can see the world from your living room. Browse Google maps for your dream destinations or take virtual field trips at worldwide aquariums, zoos, or theaters.
  • Browse a world famous museum. Also from the comfort of your own couch, travel through popular museums and view art installments, historical exhibits, and more! 
  • Go sky high! Search your favorite roller coasters in POV mode on Youtube for an exciting adventure.
  • Dig for gold. Try online scavenger hunts for more fun, especially those to keep you thinking historically! 
Travel! From the comfort of your own couch, of course. No need to risk exposure when you can see the world from your living room. Browse Google maps for your dream destinations or take virtual field trips at worldwide aquariums, zoos, or theaters. #digitalfieldtrip #googletravel #digitaltravel #travelfromyourcouch
These aren't just teacher brain breaks, either! These activities would also be great for kiddos of any age. Most importantly, no matter how old you are, prioritize your mental health and sanity in any way you can. Kentucky Governor, Andy Beshear, reminds Kentucky citizens of this vital fact and reiterates that social distancing is not isolation. 
Beshear says, "Isolation is not what we're asking for and it's not healthy. Kids ought to continue to have a schedule and so should adults. You should continue to get outside. It doesn't mean that you close down your life and you hunker down in your home."
Treat your brain, body, and sanity with love and compassion throughout this difficult time! Take all the brain breaks you can, and try to stay positive throughout this state of emergency. Best wishes! #teachingsanity #brainbreaksforteachers #teachertips
Treat your brain, body, and sanity with love and compassion throughout this difficult time! Take all the brain breaks you can, and try to stay positive throughout this state of emergency. Best wishes!

Happy Teaching, from wherever you may be teaching,
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Brittany Cloyd
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Creating an Interactive (and Engaging) Classroom for Effective Behavior Management

Creating an Interactive (and Engaging) Classroom for Effective Behavior Management


Middle and high school teachers often state that their greatest challenge is finding effective classroom management strategies. Classroom management is usually taught in education preparation programs, but it is skimmed over or introduced from older manuals and programs that worked with students from previous generations. Our current students require newer and more effective strategies that deal with the world we live in today.
Middle and high school teachers often state that their greatest challenge is finding effective classroom management strategies. Classroom management is usually taught in education preparation programs, but it is skimmed over or introduced from older manuals and programs that worked with students from previous generations. Our current students require newer and more effective strategies that deal with the world we live in today. #teachingstrategies #classroommanagement #teachinghighschool #teachingmiddleschool

Classroom Management Does NOT Stand-Alone

Older methods of classroom management rely on checklists, call words, or calendars that responded to inappropriate behaviors. They are reactionary strategies. These no longer work effectively and often require more time and training than they are worth.

In addition to the ineffectiveness of stand-alone programs, these strategies often ask teachers to step away from teaching their content to teach appropriate behaviors or to implement appropriate responses to negative student interactions. In classrooms where time is already short for ever-growing curriculum standards, taking time out for interruptions is not effective.

Interactive and Engaging Classrooms

One of the best pieces of advice given by more experienced teachers is to keep your students busy. When your students are busy, they have less time to find trouble. This is very true, but the method in which you keep students busy is the key.

Text-reading, repetitive desk work, or even online activities that do not draw student interest can lead to student boredom and a lack of engagement.

An Interactive Classroom is NOT (solely):
Using Internet Resources
Using an Interactive Notebook format
Using Google Drive or Google Classroom

It is Interpersonal learning.

A truly interactive classroom is ACTIVE! It involves students being up and moving around the room. Students are talking and interacting with one another. They are practicing skills like inquiry, investigation, and analysis. And they are working cooperatively to solve problems.
A truly interactive classroom is ACTIVE! It involves students being up and moving around the room. Students are talking and interacting with one another. They are practicing skills like inquiry, investigation, and analysis. And they are working cooperatively to solve problems. #interactivestrategies #teachingtips

A truly interactive classroom is ACTIVE! It involves students being up and moving around the room. Students are talking and interacting with one another. They are practicing skills like inquiry, investigation, and analysis. And they are working cooperatively to solve problems. #interactivestrategies #teachingtips

Creating an Interactive Classroom

Creating an interactive classroom does not have to be a separate practice from lesson planning or mapping out your curriculum. Interactivity can even be utilized when using more traditional resources or with tech-based programs. It simply requires movement and interaction.

Seating

Start by changing up your seating. Move desks into groups or pair of student desks for easier collaboration. If you can move to flexible seating, you can strategically create options for rewarding students simply by offering a seat change. And if all else fails, remove the desks from your classroom. It may sound crazy, but students love sitting on the floor and stretching out to work on assignments with one another. Invest in pillows or rugs and let the cooperation begin!

Grouping

Student grouping and collaboration is vital for an interactive classroom. When students are allowed to interact, they ask more questions, engage more in discussion, and think more critically about the content they are researching. While some will suggest mixed-ability grouping, varied grouping can be even more beneficial for all students. Change up the groups open and even allow student-chosen grouping from time to time.

Strategies

Any activity can be turned into an interactive lesson. Even text reading can evolve from an individual, silent activity to a collaborative, group exchange of reading and discussion. However, some strategies lend themselves to more effective collaboration and learning than others.

The Teacher's Role in an Interactive Classroom

Interactive classrooms do not only require student movement, but also teacher movement. Your role still requires teaching and direction-giving, but also involves movement around the room to guide students toward greater engagement and deeper thought. You will teach, facilitate, interact, guide, question, assess, offer feedback, and offer redirection. Steps in your instruction that have previously been done through paper exchange (grading) can now be done orally and within the process of active learning.

While creating an interactive classroom does require more planning and preparation, it will have an incredible payoff in your classroom. #interactiveclassroom
While creating an interactive classroom does require more planning and preparation, it will have an incredible payoff in your classroom. You will find that your students are more engaged, interested in the content, and willing to participate. In turn, this will create better learning and less behavior issues. Your classroom management will be taken care of by your new classroom instruction strategies.

Happy Teaching!




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Brittany Cloyd
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I Have a Dream: Teaching Unity for Martin Luther King Day and Black History Month

I Have a Dream: Teaching Unity for Martin Luther King Day and Black History Month


Over five decades ago, the inspiring Martin Luther King, Jr., summed up our purpose as teachers.
"The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education.” 

While the politics of our public school system may challenge this sentiment daily, we as teachers know the true motivation beyond our dedication. We hope to leave each student better than before they crossed the threshold of our classroom.  Our goal is to foster intelligence plus character in our young students.

Each year as our country celebrates Martin Luther King Day in January and then continues the conversation with Black History Month in February, we often wish to incorporate the history behind the celebrations into our lesson plans. Though I encourage you to include this in your lessons every day (as well as teaching about other cultures and contributors to history), I think this time can be very instrumental in driving the conversation in our classrooms toward a message of love and unity. 

While working to advance civil rights in the late 1950s and 1960s, Martin Luther King Jr. spoke out about using a nonviolent approach and civil disobedience to disrupt the system that was failing people of color. Surrounded by hatred and violence, MLK chose a message of love instead.
"Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that."
As modern day teachers, we often get bogged down by the sheer volume of curriculum that should be covered in the course of a school year. Drowning in lesson plans, we may stray from the idea that our lessons should be laced with more than content; we should be teaching love, unity, and compassion to tomorrow's leaders. 
Each year as our country celebrates Martin Luther King Day in January and then continues the conversation with Black History Month in February, we often wish to incorporate the history behind the celebrations into our lesson plans. Though I encourage you to include this in your lessons every day (as well as teaching about other cultures and contributors to history), I think this time can be very instrumental in driving the conversation in our classrooms toward a message of love and unity. #mlk #martinlutherking #blackhistory #love #unity #united #socialstudies
In fact, even the name of the discipline, Social Studies, lends to teaching beyond the history book. Social Studies teachers have an obligation to teach the interactions and characteristics of the human race. By glossing over this important holiday (and upcoming Black History Month) by sticking to the history, we may be doing a great disservice to our classrooms of tiny humans. 

You can empower your students by helping them to find commonalities and similarities by providing a united classroom community and a safe space to embrace differences. 
“We may have all come on different ships, but we’re in the same boat now.”
There are so many great lesson plans and activities to incorporate in your lesson planning for January and February, and beyond. Try some of the following activities to celebrate Martin Luther King Day or the upcoming Black History Month.  

Martin Luther King Walking Tour
Try this non-traditional activity to get students moving and thinking. Engage students in a real-life scavenger hunt to collect clues about Martin Luther King, Jr., his life, and his contributions. 

Digital 1:1 Martin Luther King Activity
Looking for something more 1:1? This activity allows students to work independently to uncover important facts about Martin Luther King, Jr. and his work.

Quick Quotes Activity
This one-day activity explores Martin Luther King, Jr.'s own spoken words, analyzing his different political causes with quotes on varying topics.

"I Have a Dream" Speech Primary Source Analysis
Want to explore MLK from a literary perspective? This primary source analysis breaks down Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech.

Significant Contributions of African Americans
Continue your teaching into Black History Month with this centers activity, meant to discuss significant contributions of African Americans.

FREE! Significant African Americans Quote Analysis
Dive deeper into the contributions of significant African Americans by analyzing quotes in this free activity!

No matter which activities you choose to incorporate in your upcoming lessons, remember the important reason for teaching these sensitive lessons. Remind yourself, as well as your students, that even the smallest step toward progress is indeed progress.
“If I cannot do great things, I can do small things in a great way.”
By teaching these difficult lessons to the impressionable young minds in your classroom, you may make a bigger impact than is conceivable. Continue to build a strong classroom community of open-minded, compassionate humans, and you will be successful in teaching. #teaching #socialstudies #students #history
By teaching these difficult lessons to the impressionable young minds in your classroom, you may make a bigger impact than is conceivable. Continue to build a strong classroom community of open-minded, compassionate humans, and you will be successful in teaching.

Happy Teaching!






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Brittany Cloyd
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Drawing Games in the Classroom: Themed Variations on the Urban Game

Drawing Games in the Classroom: Themed Variations on the Urban Game


You've likely heard of the Urban Game that is spreading like wildfire. An interesting exercise for secondary Social Studies classes, the teacher rapidly instructs students to modify a big paper drawing of an urban city. At the end of the exercise, students can make comparisons and draw parallels to the challenges faced by urbanization of their city.
You've likely heard of the Urban Game that is spreading like wildfire. An interesting exercise for secondary Social Studies classes, the teacher rapidly instructs students to modify a big paper drawing of an urban city. At the end of the exercise, students can make comparisons and draw parallels to the challenges faced by urbanization of their city. #urbangame #socialstudies #lessonplanning #bigpaperactivity

The Urban Game is great in the classroom because it allows students to step outside the box and tap into their right brains for artistic skills and inspired creativity. Students have to turn on their listening ears, block out distractions, and work collaboratively to accomplish the assignment. In my previous post, Teamwork and Collaboration in the Classroom: An Exercise to Assess Direction Following, I introduced the American Revolution Drawing Game, a spin-off of the Urban Game meant to walk students through the booming revolution, one advancement (or setback) at a time.

But this drawing game has value outside your unit on the American Revolution, too. There are so many ways to modify the Drawing Game to study different time periods, units, and regional differences.

You can introduce your unit on Westward Expansion with the Westward Expansion Drawing Game. Covering the Transcontinental Railroad, immigration, Chinese Railroad Workers, the California Gold Rush, the Pony Express, the Oregon Trail, the Louisiana Purchase, and more, this Drawing Game can introduce students to the Expansion of America in a fun and engaging way.

Students can also dive into the American Civil War Drawing Game, where they'll discover Slavery in the US, the Abolition Movement, the Missouri Compromise, Harriet Tubman & the Underground Railroad, Fort Sumter, the Battles of Big Run and Gettysburg, the Emancipation Proclamation, and more.

The Immigration into America: 1850 to 1910 Drawing Game covers the Gilded Age through the lenses of immigration, urbanization, overcrowding, factories and employment, Ellis Island, population differences, and more.
If you choose to do the Drawing Games in small groups, students can also benefit greatly as they develop their communication and collaboration skills, fostering a solid classroom community. #groupwork #collaboration #teamwork
Each Drawing Game activity includes the teacher script, a sample image of a completed map, debriefing notes, and suggested follow-up questions and activities. By participating, students practice listening skills, mapping, designing a key, following directions, time-lining, critical thinking, and inquiry. If you choose to do the Drawing Games in small groups, students can also benefit greatly as they develop their communication and collaboration skills, fostering a solid classroom community.

Drawing Games not only inspire your students and force them to look at the topic through a different lens, but they're also fun and engaging! #lessonplanning #unitplanning #funforteachers #funlessons #funactivitiesDrawing Games not only inspire your students and force them to look at the topic through a different lens, but they're also fun and engaging! Since they're so abstract, students may enjoy participating in the downtime before a break, or in a low-stress activity right after an extended holiday! These activities are great as introductions to a unit, or as reflection activities after you've already delved into study.

More Drawing Games are coming soon. What topic or theme would you like to see in a future Drawing Game?

Happy Teaching DRAWING!


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Michele Luck
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Teamwork and Collaboration in the Classroom: An Exercise to Assess Direction Following

Teamwork and Collaboration in the Classroom: An Exercise to Assess Direction Following


How do you feel when a hundred different directions are thrown your way? Maybe your principal comes into your classroom after a stressful class period, listing off five things to-do within the next week? Or a student asks questions about an upcoming assignment, in rapid-fire succession? Or even in your personal life, a significant other lists off the grocery list quickly and without repetition, leaving you scrambling to capture the necessities on a scrap piece of paper?
Our brains are hard-wired for processing, and our students spend much time in elementary, middle, and high school developing and improving upon these processing skills. However, we often enjoy the luxury of slowing things down, repeating them, rereading them, or asking for clarification. If this luxury is taken away, our brains overload and our sympathetic nervous system switches on. We are no longer processing information thoroughly and effectively; we're simply cataloging and sorting as quickly as our brains are able, often missing key information. #processing #lessonplanning #processingskills #learningstyles #repetition

Our brains are hard-wired for processing, and our students spend much time in elementary, middle, and high school developing and improving upon these processing skills. However, we often enjoy the luxury of slowing things down, repeating them, rereading them, or asking for clarification. If this luxury is taken away, our brains overload and our sympathetic nervous system switches on. We are no longer processing information thoroughly and effectively; we're simply cataloging and sorting as quickly as our brains are able, often missing key information.

Now imagine if you put your significant other on speaker phone while he or she rattles off the grocery list. Your children each have a pen in hand, a notebook at the ready. Your youngest turns on a cell phone recording so you can double check their finished list. They capture the list without missing a single item, and one even doodles you a silly picture to enjoy while standing in the checkout line. Your sympathetic nervous system thanks you and goes back to sleep, having woken with a start when the phone rang. You may even feel a warm and fuzzy feeling that often escapes you - sometimes, we call that relaxed!

Your students function quite the same way. Throw a ton of information at them, and they'll shut down, experiencing an automatic overload of their brains! They probably won't retain or understand any of it. But, if you break things down into simpler terms, give explicit directions, and provide clarification, they're much more likely to absorb the information at hand.

Sometimes, though, it may be important to kick their sympathetic nervous systems into high gear because you're teaching them a hard-learned lesson.

A true Social Studies lesson is one that leaves an impact beyond that of a textbook quiz or multiple-choice standardized test. Impactful Social Studies lessons transport one's mind, but also one's heart. By enticing a fight or flight reaction from your students, they're likely to feel the impact of the lesson. #socialstudies #lessonplan #socialstudieslesson #teachingsocialstudies
For instance, imagine the year is 1760 and we are in the American colony of Massachusetts. The scene begins in the harbor city of Boston.

Immediately, your mind probably transports you elsewhere, and you hone in on your new location and era. However, you not only want your students to learn about a moment in history, but you want them to experience it. A true Social Studies lesson is one that leaves an impact beyond that of a textbook quiz or multiple-choice standardized test. Impactful Social Studies lessons transport one's mind, but also one's heart. By enticing a fight or flight reaction from your students, they're likely to feel the impact of the lesson.

Since this heightened sense of arousal clashes with the need to capture details and mass information, students may feel conflicted and check out. By employing the teamwork and collaboration of their classmates, just like the pencil-armed offspring in the earlier example, your students can work together to relieve the stress of the situation, adequately capturing the information at hand while still feeling the "stress" of the situation in which you've input them.

Now, it should be said that we don't want to intentionally stress our students out - at least, not regularly and not without a purpose. But, when teaching students about important historical events that have an emotional impact, a little fuel on the fire may inspire students to relate to the events on a deeper level. Also, they may understand the chaos or disorder felt by those who experienced the events firsthand. Bringing this aspect of stress into the classroom helps students to feel the dire situational stressors felt by those in wartime, in oppressed cultures, in less than desirable circumstances, in a way that they otherwise may overlook.

You can take your students to that harbor city in 1760 as well, walking them through the American Revolution with little direction. Forcing them to face the chaos and disorder of the economic developments, passed legislature, and even deaths during this brutal time. By instructing your students to work together in small groups of two or three, they can work on this big paper exercise with a small dose of that cortisol increase but also the collaboration of their classmates, testing their teamwork skills and how well they follow directions all at once. Students will understand, after the fact, why the lesson was presented in such a rushed manner. And hopefully, they'll take away a bit of that empathy within the lesson.

Try the American Revolution Drawing Game in your classroom for a multi-faceted lesson plan on the history of the American Revolution, teamwork and collaboration skills, and direction-following. #newteachers #teaching #teachinghistory #teachingamericanrevolution #americanrevolution
Try the American Revolution Drawing Game in your classroom for a multi-faceted lesson plan on the history of the American Revolution, teamwork and collaboration skills, and direction-following. You give rapid-fire verbal descriptors to your class, instructing them to capture the city of Boston on a freehand map, like the one pictured above - with no repeats or clarification! See how well they work together to test their listening and processing skills.

Happy Teaching!


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Brittany Cloyd
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