Traces of Ancient Egypt: Thoughts from an Egyptologist Turned Kids' Writer

Traces of Ancient Egypt: Thoughts from an Egyptologist Turned Kids' Writer



Instead of posting this week on a new strategy or resource for teaching in the Social Studies classroom, I have invited Malayna Evans to write a guest post about teaching Ancient Egypt to middle school students. 
Malayna Evans is releasing her book, Jagger Jones and the Mummy's Ankh, in May and she is guest blogging on A Lesson Plan for Teachers on #teaching about Ancient Egypt in the #middleschool classroom. I know students will love her #3.

Malayna Evans was raised in the mountains of Utah and spent her childhood climbing, skiing, reading Sci-Fi, and finding trouble. Many years later, she earned her Ph.D. in ancient Egyptian history from the University of Chicago. She's used her education to craft a time-travel series set in ancient Egypt. Book one, Jagger Jones and the Mummy's Ankh, is out in May of 2019. She enjoys visiting classrooms to share her passion for ancient Egypt, travel, and coffee. Malayna lives in Oak Park, Il, with her two kids, a rescue dog, and a hamster.

Here are her thoughts!

With the upcoming release of my middle grade debut novel, Jagger Jones and the Mummy’s Ankh, I’ve been busy talking to kids about ancient Egypt. I start like this. “Imagine you lived over 3,000 years ago in ancient Egyptian. How would your life be different?”

Kids point out that they wouldn’t have an iPhone or Nikes or slime. Girls wonder if they’d have gone to school. (No, nor would most boys.) Some wonder if they’d have worshiped different gods, or ended up as mummies, or if they’d fit in or stand out.

Kids are full of smart guesses and clever questions. What surprises many are the modern objects and practices we inherited from ancient Egypt. I’ve found that talking about how this fantastical culture is still with us is a great way to engage kids.

You want to try it? Great. Here are just three things to highlight.

1. They gave us our system of writing

The ancient Egyptian were the first to marry written signs to phonetic values, starting around 3,000 BC. With thousands of signs, the language cycled through five stages and had a longer life span than any other language. It was lost until 1799, when scholars used the Rosetta Stone to crack the code--it had the same decree written in three texts: hieroglyphs, demotic, and Greek.

It’s not only the alphabet we can trace back to ancient Egypt, but also writing instruments. Egyptians took the leap from carving words into stone and clay tablets to writing on papyrus with reed pens early in Egyptian history. This spread to the Mediterranean and West Asia during the first millennium BC, when papyrus became a valued export. Eventually, Europe started using parchment and China invented paper around 100 BC, using a technique that we still use today.
2. They established the systems we use to mark time

Kids are more surprised to learn that the Egyptians invented our calendar.

Okay, it was a little different. It was split into three seasons and twelve months, each made up of three ten-day-long weeks. If you do the math, you’ll see that only equates to 360 days, which meant the calendar slowly shifted out of synch with the irrigation cycle. So they tacked five extra days onto it--birthdays of the gods. In 30 BC, the Romans tweaked this calendar, adding an extra day every fourth year, to give us the calendar we use today.

Ancient Egyptians were also the first to measure time using both water clocks and sun/shadow clocks.

3. They were very fashion forward

Kids get a kick out of learning that Egyptians were serious fashionistas. They invented loads of items designed to beautify that are still with us today.

Wigs, for example, were commonly worn by men and women, as was make-up. They made lipstick and blush from clay, eyeliner and eye shadow from fat, and their nail polish and hair color was a form of henna. They used toothpaste, toothbrushes, and breath mints. And yes, their toothpaste really did include mint. Their breath wasn’t the only thing that smelled good: they made perfume from aromatic woods, incense and animal fats, sometimes using it in wax form so it would melt throughout the day, leaving the wearer smelling fresh and yummy. Oh, and their clothes and jewelry were to die for. They even had high heels!


I hope these starter ideas are helpful. One of the most rewarding things about using my Ph.D. in ancient Egyptian history to write a middle grade book was invisibly weaving aspects of the history kids probably don’t already know about into the adventure. Well, that and the mummies!



Find out more about Malayna through the links below.

Malayna Evans is releasing her book, Jagger Jones and the Mummy's Ankh, in May and she is guest blogging on A Lesson Plan for Teachers on #teaching about Ancient Egypt in the #middleschool classroom. I know students will love her #3. And if you'd like classroom-ready resources to supplement those from Malayna, take a look at my Complete Ancient Egypt Unit with interactive resources to keep students engaged and excited about learning history.

Happy Teaching!
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Michele Luck
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How to Introduce the Asian Continent in an Engaging Way

How to Introduce the Asian Continent in an Engaging Way


"Class, meet Asia." Well, that was easy, wasn't it? But introducing your students to the Asian continent requires a bit more than a simple introduction. In fact, easing into a unit on Asia can be overwhelming as students may have trouble relating to those on a completely different continent. But it doesn't have to be a dreaded transition! Introducing the Asian continent in an engaging way will spark students to seek knowledge, approach the lessons with curiosity, and begin to draw conclusions about the continent all while skipping over that overwhelmed resistance to learn new things.
"Class, meet Asia." Well, that was easy, wasn't it? But introducing your students to the Asian continent requires a bit more than a simple introduction. In fact, easing into a unit on Asia can be overwhelming as students may have trouble relating to those on a completely different continent. But it doesn't have to be a dreaded transition! Introducing the Asian continent in an engaging way will spark students to seek knowledge, approach the lessons with curiosity, and begin to draw conclusions about the continent all while skipping over that overwhelmed resistance to learn new things. #asia #lessonplanning #teachinghighschool #teachingmiddleschool #teachaboutasia #learnaboutasia


There are many resources on the wide-reaching world wide web for teaching about Asia, but your middle school and high school students may disengage from lessons that are boring, repetitive, lacking in creativity, and catering to only one learning style. Instead, using engaging walking tours like this Asia Walking Tour will act as a quick catalyst to encourage learning. By integrating this walking tour, along with these other Asia-centered lesson plans, into your unit plans, your students can broaden their existing knowledge and develop a deeper interest in Asia.

Stroll Around Asia (well, your classroom): Engage students with this interesting Asia Walking Tour which requires groups of students to walk around the room and interact with different cards about Asia, collecting information to compare and contrast, learn basic demographic information, delve into cultural, social, and political descriptions, and more.Overwhelmed about teaching a new unit? Stressed about planning long, drawn-out lessons? Fear not! Using ready-made lesson plans that are engaging and interesting for your students will ease your workload and provide the results you want to see in your classroom! #teachingmadeeasy #teachingaboutasia #learningaboutasia #newteacher #howtoteach

Once you've grazed the surface, you can encourage deeper learning by integrating these other Asia activities into your lesson plans. 

 

Map it Out with the Asia Geography Introduction Atlas Activity or the Mapping the Asian Empires Activity

Dig into the Chinese Dynasties with the Chinese Dynasties Interactive Lecture, Chinese Han Dynasty & Silk Road Activity, or a Chinese Dynasties Archaeological Dig

Analyze Imperialism with the Imperialism 4-Thought Organizer and Primary Source Analysis Activity or Age of Imperialism Guided Notes

Do it all with the Complete Unit on Asia

For other activities to build your unit on the Asian Continent, check out more than 20 resources on Asia here


At this point in the year, your students are likely counting down the days to summer vacation. You may be inclined to ease up on the content and let students coast through to standardized testing. Don't forget your responsibility to prepare your students for more than the tests! Prepare them for life, prepare them for college, prepare them for further education. But even more importantly, prepare them to work consistently toward a strong knowledge base! Be the teacher that pushes them just a bit further, that encourages them to work another day, that instills a love for learning so great, they're unable to put their desire for knowledge to bed. #encouragelearning #teacheveryday #learneveryday #alwayslearning #teacherexpectations
Building a strong, engaging unit on Asia doesn't have to be difficult. In fact, it can be exciting for students and can provide a firm foundation for learning more about the continent. Using these existing resources limits your planning time, and these activities are sure to fit into any unit on Asia!

Happy Teaching!

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Michele Luck
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Tired of Playing Catch-up in the Classroom? Here’s How to Fix It!

Tired of Playing Catch-up in the Classroom? Here’s How to Fix It!


Are you tired of playing catch-up in the classroom? Scrambling to plan and prep, grade papers, and always racing against the clock? It doesn’t have to be that way! Luckily, if you’re always playing catch-up in the classroom, there’s an easy way to fix it. By working ahead instead of staying behind, planning and prepping over the summer break to lay a strong foundation for the start of the school year, and using readily-available tips and techniques to make lesson planning, grading, and teaching easier, you can find yourself ahead of the game before the next break!

Are you tired of playing catch-up in the classroom? Scrambling to plan and prep, grade papers, and always racing against the clock? It doesn’t have to be that way! Luckily, if you’re always playing catch-up in the classroom, there’s an easy way to fix it. By working ahead instead of staying behind, planning and prepping over the summer break to lay a strong foundation for the start of the school year, and using readily-available tips and techniques to make lesson planning, grading, and teaching easier, you can find yourself ahead of the game before the next break! #lessonplanning #classroommanagement #whyiteach
The most effective teachers don’t try to recreate the wheel. Instead, they use resources that are easily-accessed, easy-to-implement, and easy on the budget! Luckily, there are a few resources and techniques that will help you finally put the game of catch-up to bed. Implementing some or all of these fixes will help you to not only find more time in your hectic school day, but also lessen your stress level! (And in today’s school environment, don’t we all need a little stress relief?!)


How do you get started? Well, building a solid foundation is the best way to kick off the school year right. By effectively planning your units, you can ensure that you’re meeting all content standards, maximizing student understanding, and making your job easier!


Organized Curriculum Mapping: This (FREE!) Curriculum Calendar or Map Template will help you map or organize your unit plans with ease. No longer will you look down to find your desk littered with lesson plans and no longer will you struggle to properly format your weekly/monthly/unit-long plans. Remove the guesswork with the Curriculum Calendar.

Seamless Lesson Planning: Use these Google Drive templates to lesson plan and unit plan! Design online and print as needed. You can include standards, objectives, program of studies, daily activities, bellringers, exit slips, modifications, and more! Adaptable for a 15 day unit plan and great for students who need to complete make-up work.

Clearly Communicating Your Expectations: Just as important as a well-developed unit plan, a syllabus is instrumental to starting the school year off on the right foot. Providing clear, understandable expectations to your students from day one will help to smoothe the inevitable transition period at the beginning of each school year, and will allow everyone to easily access the plan for the year. This specific World History Syllabus template includes strategies for teaching World History content, student responsibilities, discipline policies, grading policies, and a parent/student contract. Easily editable, this syllabus is perfect for any World History or World Studies class.

Advanced Placement (AP) Preparation: Though all classes need proper preparation, your AP courses especially need thorough development and attention to detail! Using this editable 16-page AP Introduction Packet, you can communicate strategies, expectations, grading options, course requirements, supply lists, summer assignments, thesis assistance, study skills, and graphic organizers! A complete resource for AP courses, this one is a must-have.

Complete Back to School Classroom Organization: To ensure that you have ALL the resources, tips, and techniques necessary to start the school year right, this Back to School Organization and Classroom Management Bundle aligns with Angela Watson’s 40 Hour Teacher Workweek. This bundle includes seating charts, organizational tools and posters, lesson organization, classroom management tools, first day activities, student organizers, teacher portfolio guides, and tons of other products!

New teacher? First day jitters? Don't become the teacher who is always playing catch-up in your classroom! Staying two steps behind in a classroom that is moving at full-speed around you will only lead to stress and resentment toward your career! By planning throughout the summer and implementing new teaching techniques and fixes to help ease you into your first school year, you can start the year on a solid foundation that will surely lead to success! #newteacher #whyiteach #firstdayofschool #firstyearteacher

The Ultimate Lesson Plan for Teachers: For a more comprehensive guide to all things teaching, A Lesson Plan for Teachers, New or Old (Experienced, that is!) is a step-by-step guide for any student teacher, new teacher, or experienced teacher. It covers all aspects of an effective, efficient, high-expectations classroom. Including organization, the first day of school, administration, co-worker relationships, and many antecdotes, this book really has it all.

Combatting First Day Jitters: If you need a little more help in the first day of school department, this First Day of School Guide will help to plan the perfect start to your school year. With an introduction on expectations and standards, a full agenda with ice breakers, introductions, syllabi coverage, and more, this guide will help you plan a first day lesson plan that you can work through without the butterflies.

BONUS! Scavenge your way through the first day with this Editable First Days of School Classroom Scavenger Hunt. With a little humor, you’ll survive the first day basics without a hitch!

Soliciting Student Feedback: After you’ve perfectly planned and executed the first day, this Student Survey for Learning Evaluation will ensure that all expectations are communicated effectively and your students have a good understanding of how the year will progress. Providing them this outlet for feedback involves everyone in the learning process.

Are you a Grade A procrastinator, barely surviving school year after school year, finishing each lesson plan a day late and a dollar short with a stress level off the charts? Why?! There are so many existing techniques, lesson plans, and teaching techniques that can break your procrastination habit! Start the next school year on solid ground with summer preparation that will set you up for a successful school year! #procrastinatingteacher #gradeaprocrastinator #teacherswhoprocrastinate #teachingstrategies
Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, and your parents probably drilled the same adage into your head. To be successful, be prepared! A teacher who is playing catch-up in the classroom is already two steps behind. It’s hard enough to get caught up, but even harder to get ahead! Planning and preparing over the summer can help you to build a strong foundation for the school year and you can move with ease to the next break! Using these resources to keep daily obligations at a minimum and tweaking lessons and grading to work effectively for you will help you to stay one step ahead of the next curve ball that comes your way.

Happy Teaching!

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Michele Luck
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A Learning Process for Optimal Student Understanding

A Learning Process for Optimal Student Understanding


If you've been to a Professional Development course anytime in the last decade or so, you've likely heard the terms "multiple intelligences" and "differentiated learning" a couple dozen times. While it may seem overwhelming to apply these "up-and-coming" principles to your already existent lesson plans and teaching strategies, optimizing student understanding in your classroom doesn't have to be an overhaul. Instead, by simply integrating a few core ideas into your lesson plans, your middle school and high school students will reap the benefits by finding a learning process that works best for them.

If you've been to a Professional Development course anytime in the last decade or so, you've likely heard the terms "multiple intelligences" and "differentiated learning" a couple dozen times. While it may seem overwhelming to apply these "up-and-coming" principles to your already existent lesson plans and teaching strategies, optimizing student understanding in your classroom doesn't have to be an overhaul. Instead, by simply integrating a few core ideas into your lesson plans, your middle school and high school students will reap the benefits by finding a learning process that works best for them.#multipleintelligences #differentiatedlearning #middleschool #highschool #lessonplanning #teaching #learningstyles

Though the science of learning changes often, the underlying concepts normally stay the same. Teaching your students to describe, research, analyze, predict, interpret, map, and summarize allows them to dabble in many different learning styles, and you'll reach different students with each step. By providing a generalized, overall learning process for optimal student understanding, you can prepare your students not only for your course and your tests, but for future educational endeavors. This process can be applied in many different lesson plans, and after ingraining these easy steps into the minds of your students, learning through multiple intelligences and differentiated learning techniques will become second nature.

>>> <<<

Seamlessly integrate this basic 7-step learning process for
optimal student understanding in your lesson plans!
If you've been to a Professional Development course anytime in the last decade or so, you've likely heard the terms "multiple intelligences" and "differentiated learning" a couple dozen times. While it may seem overwhelming to apply these "up-and-coming" principles to your already existent lesson plans and teaching strategies, optimizing student understanding in your classroom doesn't have to be an overhaul. Instead, by simply integrating a few core ideas into your lesson plans, your middle school and high school students will reap the benefits by finding a learning process that works best for them.#multipleintelligences #differentiatedlearning #middleschool #highschool #lessonplanning #teaching #learningstyles

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< STEP 1 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

 > PRE-READ <

Have students pre-read to define vocabulary and concepts for a topic of study.  


<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< STEP 2 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

The FOUR THOUGHT PROCESS asks students to follow four easy steps to proceed.

> DESCRIBE IT <
 > RESEARCH IT <
> ANALYZE IT <
> PREDICT IT <

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< STEP 3 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

> INTERPRET IT <

Allow students to apply their new knowledge by using interpretation skills.

 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< STEP 4 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Multiple topics can be covered to expand learning and allow for comparison between topics. 

you'd have students compare and contrast different countries.  

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< STEP 5 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

> MAP IT <

Helps students visualize information in a different way.

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< STEP 6 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

> ILLUSTRATE IT <

Steps 5 and 6 provide the opportunity for your visual learners
to process information more effectively.

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< STEP 7 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

> SUMMARIZE IT <

Serves as a wrap up assignment or assessment of student understanding. 

>>> <<<

If you've been to a Professional Development course anytime in the last decade or so, you've likely heard the terms "multiple intelligences" and "differentiated learning" a couple dozen times. While it may seem overwhelming to apply these "up-and-coming" principles to your already existent lesson plans and teaching strategies, optimizing student understanding in your classroom doesn't have to be an overhaul. Instead, by simply integrating a few core ideas into your lesson plans, your middle school and high school students will reap the benefits by finding a learning process that works best for them.#multipleintelligences #differentiatedlearning #middleschool #highschool #lessonplanning #teaching #learningstyles
By sliding these 7 easy steps into your lesson plans, your differentiated learners are sure to embrace the learning style that best fits them. Appealing to different multiple intelligences doesn't have to be overwhelming, stressful, or difficult. Instead, by using a simple strategy like this learning process for optimal student learning, you can forge through your lessons, ensuring that you reach every student to the best of your abilities. Doing so will not only be more rewarding in your role as a teacher, but you'll likely see pride reflected in the eyes of your students, too.


Happy Teaching!
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Michele Luck
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5 Tips for Teaching Presidential Contributions on Presidents' Day

5 Tips for Teaching Presidential Contributions on Presidents' Day


Though a small percentage of your students may learn well from rote memorization, many need a more engaging lesson to help them retain facts, specific information, and comparisons among our American Presidents. Teaching Presidential Contributions to your middle school and high school students can move beyond boring memorization with the right teaching strategies and a sure-fire lesson plan! Perfect for a lesson before or after Presidents' Day, or really any time of year, learning about the contributions of our Presidents can be engaging, fun, and even memorable.
 Though a small percentage of your students may learn well from rote memorization, many need a more engaging lesson to help them retain facts, specific information, and comparisons among our American Presidents. Teaching Presidential Contributions to your middle school and high school students can move beyond boring memorization with the right teaching strategies and a sure-fire lesson plan! Perfect for a lesson before or after Presidents' Day, or really any time of year, learning about the contributions of our Presidents can be engaging, fun, and even memorable. #teaching #lessonplans #UShistory #Presidentsday #USPresidents #Presidentialcontributions


With walking tours, centers and small group activities, matching games, an engaging Facebook-based research activity, and scavenger hunts, your Presidents' Day lessons can break the monotony of everyday history. By traveling through the last three centuries, students can compare and contrast those who have held our highest governmental office - the Office of the President. They can also tie this knowledge to general civics education and US History content. These 5 tips for teaching Presidential Contributions allow you to take what works in your lesson plan, and leave what doesn't!
Though a small percentage of your students may learn well from rote memorization, many need a more engaging lesson to help them retain facts, specific information, and comparisons among our American Presidents. Teaching Presidential Contributions to your middle school and high school students can move beyond boring memorization with the right teaching strategies and a sure-fire lesson plan! Perfect for a lesson before or after Presidents' Day, or really any time of year, learning about the contributions of our Presidents can be engaging, fun, and even memorable. #teaching #lessonplans #UShistory #Presidentsday #USPresidents #Presidentialcontributions


1. Guide your students on a Walking Tour through history by actively exploring ten of our most famous presidents with centers on biographical and political information, their path to presidency, their most significant contributions, their daily life as president, and miscellaneous interesting facts!

2. Bring back the Matching Game of your students' fondest childhood memories by timing them while they match biographical and political information with each president's name and picture! Have your students MATCH OFF by seeing who can compete for the fastest time.

3. Allow your students a bit of social media time to 'FRIEND' our Presidents and 'LIKE' their About Me sections! Use this template to create fake Facebook profiles for the Presidents and then post them all together on the classroom Facebook Timeline.

4. Send your kids on a Scavenger Hunt as they search for answers to clue cards on the Presidents! Regroup and discuss or have students answer wrap-up questions to reflect on their findings.

5.  Tie the information students have learned on the Presidents into our overall governmental framework with a Response Group Activity! Have them reflect on the responsibilities of the President, the qualifications of the office, and our most popular presidents to wrap up.


Though a small percentage of your students may learn well from rote memorization, many need a more engaging lesson to help them retain facts, specific information, and comparisons among our American Presidents. Teaching Presidential Contributions to your middle school and high school students can move beyond boring memorization with the right teaching strategies and a sure-fire lesson plan! Perfect for a lesson before or after Presidents' Day, or really any time of year, learning about the contributions of our Presidents can be engaging, fun, and even memorable. #teaching #lessonplans #UShistory #Presidentsday #USPresidents #Presidentialcontributions
Using these 5 tips for teaching Presidential Contributions on Presidents' Day, you'll leave a lasting impression on your middle school and high school students. Best case scenario, they'll spend their day off contemplating government, civics, and the contributions of our significant American Presidents. Well, a teacher can have lofty dreams, right?

Happy Teaching (and dreaming...)!



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Michele Luck
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Why Teaching Black History is not just a February Thing

Why Teaching Black History is not just a February Thing


If you flip through any history textbook, you’re sure to find African American faces throughout. Many of America’s important leaders and historic figures are black - so why do we only spend one month learning about them? The biggest favor your can do your middle school and high school students is to teach about black history all year around. Teaching black history isn’t just a February thing. Integrating black history into your year-round lesson plans will prepare students for in-depth learning, provide an unbiased education about America, and connect students of all backgrounds, ethnicities, and beliefs.

If you flip through any history textbook, you’re sure to find African American faces throughout. Many of America’s important leaders and historic figures are black - so why do we only spend one month learning about them? The biggest favor your can do your middle school and high school students is to teach about black history all year around. Teaching black history isn’t just a February thing. Integrating black history into your year-round lesson plans will prepare students for in-depth learning, provide an unbiased education about America, and connect students of all backgrounds, ethnicities, and beliefs.

She did what?! Consider Nikki Clarke’s unexpected approach to teaching black history in Teach Magazine. Surely none of her students expected to learn about potato chips when she mentioned black history, but teachers must stay vigilant in highlighting the vast accomplishments by all members of our country. Brushing over 10 African American accomplishments in 30 days may seem sufficient to a teacher trying to integrate black history into their curriculum, but limiting this instruction to the shortest month of the year hardly does it justice.


Teaching Tolerance highlights the importance of de-stigmatizing black history. They warn teachers not to trivialize one person or event, and not to interrupt everyday activities to highlight a topic of black history. Because, if you’re integrating black history into your everyday lesson plans, you aren’t scrambling to cover a historical figure in a twenty-minute time block. Your students are prepared, continually learning, and grasping black history within the fuller context of America’s history.

Teaching black history year round is crucial to every Social Studies classroom, but even if you’ve successfully laid a sturdy groundwork for black history throughout the year, expanding on this education during black history month can reinforce learning. Try using a review activity like this Important African Americans Biography Centers Activity to encourage students to recall important contributions of famous African Americans they’ve previously studied.
If you flip through any history textbook, you’re sure to find African American faces throughout. Many of America’s important leaders and historic figures are black - so why do we only spend one month learning about them? The biggest favor your can do your middle school and high school students is to teach about black history all year around. Teaching black history isn’t just a February thing. Integrating black history into your year-round lesson plans will prepare students for in-depth learning, provide an unbiased education about America, and connect students of all backgrounds, ethnicities, and beliefs.
Or, highlight one of our most famous American activists, Martin Luther King, Jr., with a Scavenger Hunt, task card activity, or Walking Tour with this activity. Threading these activities into an all-inclusive curriculum will ensure that students understand the importance of their African American leaders and innovators, but also that they clearly understand the all-encompassing thread woven throughout their lives by their black predecessors.

If you flip through any history textbook, you’re sure to find African American faces throughout. Many of America’s important leaders and historic figures are black - so why do we only spend one month learning about them? The biggest favor your can do your middle school and high school students is to teach about black history all year around. Teaching black history isn’t just a February thing. Integrating black history into your year-round lesson plans will prepare students for in-depth learning, provide an unbiased education about America, and connect students of all backgrounds, ethnicities, and beliefs.
Many teachers shy away from teaching controversial topics, but cramming all of your black history instruction into one month does a disservice to your students. Integrate these ideas and important peoples throughout your lesson plans all year. Provide an adequate groundwork for students to understand the contributions of black Americans. By using lessons like these throughout the year, your students will have a better understanding of the wide-reaching accomplishments of their fellow Americans of all colors.


Happy Teaching!


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Michele Luck
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